Psychology articles list

Does active social media use improve subjective well-being? - a mediation model

Social media use is inherently linked to everyday life in the digital world, from professional contexts to leisure time. Prior research focused on antecedents of social media use such as personality traits, age, gender, social skills, and also on broad range of its various effects. Positive effects include extension of friendship network, diminishing anxiety in social interaction, and improving exercise motivation. Problematic social media use and addiction are related to stress, depression, suicidal thoughts, loneliness, and scarce school engagement. Less attention has been paid to the relationship between social media use and well-being. Inconsistent results were obtained; being emphasized either small relationship between time spent using social media and psychological well-being, or absence of significant correlation. Aims: Therefore, we analyzed in this research what degree and how active social media use and self-esteem would lead to subjective well-being. Starting from the necessary distinction between the passive and active social media use, the aim of this study was to analyze the direct and indirect effects of active use and self-esteem on subjective well-being. Method: Based on a cross-sectional design, the survey data was collected from a sample consisted of 653 participants (male = 274; M age = 21.52; SD = 4.33). To verify the hypothesized direct and indirect effects included in the multiple mediation model, a path analysis was performed. Results: The findings showed positive association between active social media use, self-esteem, affective engagement in social media use, sense to belong to online community, number of friends/followers, and subjective well-being, The path analysis revealed excellent fit between proposed mediation model and sample data. Active social media use has directly effect on subjective well-being, and indirectly via sense to belong to online community. Interaction between active social media use and self-esteem significantly predicts subjective well-being. The relationship between affective engagement in social media use and sense to belong to online community is mediated by number of friends or followers on social media platforms. Conclusion: The findings of this study extend the previous research, providing support for the relationship between active social media use and subjective well-being. Keywords: active social media use; number of friends/followers; affective engagement in social media use; sense to belong to online community; subjective well-being; mediation analysis.

Elena Stănculescu

Affective tendencies in embarrassing situations and academic cheating behavior

The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between affective tendencies in embarrassing situations and cheating behavior in a sample of adolescents. Two objectives were addressed: first, exploring the relationship between cheating behavior and shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, externalization, and detachment; second, analyzing the mediating role of detachment in the relationship between externalization and cheating behavior. The results showed positive correlations between the cheating behavior and externalization and detachment, a negative correlation with guilt, and no relation with shame. It was confirmed the mediating role of detachment. Implications for educators were discussed, emphasizing the importance of stimulation of students’ moral rules understanding.

Elena Stănculescu

Psychological predictors and mediators of subjective well-being in a sample of romanian teachers

The study examined psychological predictors and mediators of teacher subjective well-being. Participants included 174 teachers from urban middle and highschools. The first objective was to explore the psychological correlates of the teacher SWB: self-esteem, general self-efficacy (core self-evaluation), teacher self-efficacy, optimism (cognitive trait related to the psychological well-being), and perceived social support (psychosocial trait related to the psychological wellbeing. The second objective was to investigate the mediating role of self-efficacy in the association between optimism and subjective well-being. The third objective was to explore the mediating role of teacher self-efficacy in the relation between perceived social support and teacher subjective well-being. Correlation, linear regression and mediation model analyses through the Sobel test were computed. Results confirmed the research assumptions. The findings of this study enhance the understanding of personal factors associated with teacher subjective wellbeing. The constructs linked to subjective well-being (predictors and mediators) could be target of school psychologists’ interventions, in order to have more engaged and performing teachers in schools. The findings were discussed in the context of designing the interventions for enhancement of the subjective wellbeing among teachers.

Elena Stănculescu

University students’ fear of success from the perspective of positive psychology

The aim of this study was to examine university students’ fear of success from the perspective of positive psychology. Two objectives were addressed: first, analyzing the relation between fear of success, optimism, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and search for meaning in life; second, exploring the variance of the fear of success, taking into account the affective dimension of the self (self-esteem) and search for meaning in life. The results confirmed that fear of success was positively related to search for meaning, and negatively to optimism, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. The variance of the fear of success was explained by the self-esteem and search for meaning in life. Implications for school psychologists were discussed.

Elena Stănculescu

Factor structure of schizotypal personality in india

Introduction: Schizotypal personality represents genetic underpinning of schizophrenia spectrum disorders; hence, it provides conceptual models for understanding psychosis as well as a scheme for high-risk group identification. The study of structure of schizotypal personality is largely confined to western societies, whereas its assessment in varied socio-cultural groups is highly required. Aim: To study the factor structure of schizotypal personality in an Indian population. Materials and Methods: A sample of 492 college students (age, Mean= 21.3, SD= 2.61) filled the Hindi translated version of 74- items Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) technique was used to test the fitness (consonance of the modeled relationships, among latent and observed variables, in the sampled population) of different schizotypal personality models, that is, two-, three-, four-, bi-, and uni-factor models. The best-fit model was also studied for Measurement Invariance (MI) across gender groups. Results: Three, four, and bi-factor models adequately fitted the data. Whereas, four-factor model was the best good-fit model. It also showed partially strong MI across gender groups. The internal consistency of total SPQ was 0.90 and of subscales ranged from 0.62 to 0.78. Men scored higher on several schizotypal facets but lower on social anxiety as compared to women. Conclusion: The factor structure of schizotypal personality in India is similar to that reported elsewhere in the world. Thus, the present study supports the generalisation of schizotypal personality construct to the Indian people.

Sanjay Kumar

A comparative study of social and economic aspect of migration

India is a country of immense diversity. It is home to people of many different racial, languages, ethnic, religious, and national backgrounds. Groups of people in India differ from each other not only in physical or demographic characteristics but also in distinctive patterns of behavior and these patterns are determined by social and cultural factors like language, region, religion, and caste. Apart from behaviour, economic development, level of education and political culture of the people in various social segments differ from region to region. More you can say that economy and cultures have been enriched by the contributions of migrants from round the globe. In an increasingly globalised world, migratory movements is continuously shaping the countries all over the world. Some countries like India and Ireland, which set the example of economic development and social integration, have the positive impact of the migration by globalisation and some countries like USA, which recently witness racism, xenophobia and discrimination have the negative impact on the migrants. It does not mean India do not face fragmentation and USA do not have cohesion. USA have many stories which show successful integration process, that facilitated the lives of immigrant communities, but being a developed country it still suffers from cultural alienation. In these countries, borders are built within borders to create cultural divides that do not allow people to integrate. Recently, this problem has become more prominent due to the rise of terrorism, clash of cultures in the world, leading to the glorification of stereotypes. People are becoming less accepting towards anyone who does not belong to their region. Migration does not stop after people move from one place to another place. The main question start after that ‘now what’ they will do. That is why this topic needs to be discussed thoroughly in order to find better solutions. This paper will begin with an analysis of different approaches to Migration, discuss the target groups for integration policies, provide indicators of the current situation of migrants and proceed to an analysis of integration tools: legislation, social policies and participatory processes. It will focus not only on the impact of migration but also on social integration, mix culture like indo-western culture in a comparative basis.

Ekta Meena

A comparative study of social and economic aspect of migration

India is a country of immense diversity. It is home to people of many different racial, languages, ethnic, religious, and national backgrounds. Groups of people in India differ from each other not only in physical or demographic characteristics but also in distinctive patterns of behavior and these patterns are determined by social and cultural factors like language, region, religion, and caste. Apart from behaviour, economic development, level of education and political culture of the people in various social segments differ from region to region. More you can say that economy and cultures have been enriched by the contributions of migrants from round the globe. In an increasingly globalised world, migratory movements is continuously shaping the countries all over the world. Some countries like India and Ireland, which set the example of economic development and social integration, have the positive impact of the migration by globalisation and some countries like USA, which recently witness racism, xenophobia and discrimination have the negative impact on the migrants. It does not mean India do not face fragmentation and USA do not have cohesion. USA have many stories which show successful integration process, that facilitated the lives of immigrant communities, but being a developed country it still suffers from cultural alienation. In these countries, borders are built within borders to create cultural divides that do not allow people to integrate. Recently, this problem has become more prominent due to the rise of terrorism, clash of cultures in the world, leading to the glorification of stereotypes. People are becoming less accepting towards anyone who does not belong to their region. Migration does not stop after people move from one place to another place. The main question start after that ‘now what’ they will do. That is why this topic needs to be discussed thoroughly in order to find better solutions. This paper will begin with an analysis of different approaches to Migration, discuss the target groups for integration policies, provide indicators of the current situation of migrants and proceed to an analysis of integration tools: legislation, social policies and participatory processes. It will focus not only on the impact of migration but also on social integration, mix culture like indo-western culture in a comparative basis.

Ekta Meena

Study of temperature variation in human peripheral region during wound healing process due to plastic surgery

In this paper, investigations are made to analyze the human body temperature during wound healing process due to surgery. Wound is considered after the skin graft. Skin graft is a technique used in plastic surgery. Skin is the first line of defense between the human and environment, it is very susceptible to damage. Internal body or core temperature (Tb) is one of the clinical vital signs along with pulse and respiratory rates. Any disturbance in body temperature will drive complexities in wound healing process. These studies are important in the mechanism of establishing the limits of thermal regulation of human body during the healing process in different situations and conditions. The Finite element method is used to analyze tissues temperature for normal tissues (donor site) and abnormal tissues (tissues after surgery). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed. Numerical results are obtained using Crank Nicolson Method.

Manisha Jain

Mapping the bisexual experience of a keralite woman: glimpses into india

India is not known as a country to be in for a bisexual person. Homosexual acts even within wedlock are a punishable offence in India. Legal battles over provisions in the Indian Penal Code which criminalizes any sexual act “against the order of nature” are rife. Even though Kerala has been hailed as a paradox inside India (mainly due to its human development parameters), the social, cultural and legal environment in the state is hostile to individuals who question hetero-normativity. Non-judgemental and unbiased scientific therapy or counselling are seldom available to sexual minorities. This paper is an attempt to map the experiences of a female who is openly bisexual, and is living in Kerala. An ethnographic interview was conducted where the experiences of the participant are explored, from the relationship dynamics as seen by her, to sexual experiences and difficulties in relationships. A reference is also made to the personal and social support systems that are in place for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) community in Kerala and their role in initiating discourses regarding the topic. A few pointers for future studies in the topic, especially within the context of Kerala are also put forward.

Dr. Chinchu C

Metapuf: a challenge response pair generator

Physically unclonable function (PUF) is a hardware security module preferred for hardware feature based random number and secret key generation. Security of a cryptographic system relies on the quality of the challenge-response pair, it is necessary that the key generation mechanism must unpredictable and its response should constant under different operating condition. Metastable state in CMOS latch is undesirable since it response becomes unpredictable, this feature used in this work to generate a unique response. A feedback mechanism is developed which forces the latch into the metastable region; after metastable state, latch settle to high or state depends on circuit internal condition and noise which cannot be predicted. Obtained inter hamming variation for 8 PUF is 51% and average intra hamming distance is 99.76% with supply voltage variation and 96.22% with temperature variation.

Abhishek Kumar

Intersection of caste and gender based subjugation

One of the unique features of Indian society is prevalence of caste system which was originated thousands of years back to demarcate the people engaged in different occupation or jobs. Initially it was not much rigid but gradually people belonging to upper castes for their own selfish means to maintain their monopoly made this arrangement hereditary and started treating people of lower castes disgracefully. For preservation of this system, people started controlling their women to prevent inter-caste marriages and the concept of endogamy came up. This robbed away many types of freedom from women. For women belonging to lower castes, this situation is worse as they are doubly subjugated on the basis on caste as well as gender. Men belonging to their own caste treat them as secondary beings. This paper throws light on this intersection. How intersection of these two kinds of inequalities place them at the lowest position in Indian society. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar rises as their leader who all his life worked for empowerment of downtrodden section of society. He argues that education is the primary tool for evading these differences among people. He further emphasizes to adopt the concept of exogamy to break the backbone of Indian caste system and to immediately leave a religion or culture which legitimizes such system of inequality among people of the same land.

Swati sharma

Intersection of caste and gender based subjugation

One of the unique features of Indian society is prevalence of caste system which was originated thousands of years back to demarcate the people engaged in different occupation or jobs. Initially it was not much rigid but gradually people belonging to upper castes for their own selfish means to maintain their monopoly made this arrangement hereditary and started treating people of lower castes disgracefully. For preservation of this system, people started controlling their women to prevent inter-caste marriages and the concept of endogamy came up. This robbed away many types of freedom from women. For women belonging to lower castes, this situation is worse as they are doubly subjugated on the basis on caste as well as gender. Men belonging to their own caste treat them as secondary beings. This paper throws light on this intersection. How intersection of these two kinds of inequalities place them at the lowest position in Indian society. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar rises as their leader who all his life worked for empowerment of downtrodden section of society. He argues that education is the primary tool for evading these differences among people. He further emphasizes to adopt the concept of exogamy to break the backbone of Indian caste system and to immediately leave a religion or culture which legitimizes such system of inequality among people of the same land.

Swati sharma

A literature review of emotional intelligence

Mano Matram Jagat; Mano Kalpitam Jagat - (“the world is as the mind sees and feels it; the world is as the mind thinks of it” (as qtd. by T.N.Sethumadhavan, 2010). So, our life is in the way we feel and perceive it. Humans are a mixture of emotions and reasons. Reasoning enables them to analyze and judge things with mathematical precision, while emotions help them to understand and empathize others that make them human. Traditionally, people with a high degree of logic and reasoning were believed to be intelligent and. The purpose of the IQ tests was designed to ascertain a person’s intelligence based on the reasoning and the logical aptitude of the person. IQ tests were found to be effective when a person is ‘not’ scared or angry or intrigue about specific things that aroused emotions. Emotions were considered disruptive in nature, which influences the process of thinking of a person (Woodworth, 1940). Mowrer (1960) opined that “emotions are of quite extraordinary importance in the total economy of living organisms and do not deserve being put into opposition with intelligence‟. The emotions are, it seems, themselves a higher order of intelligence.”

Aurora Lyrics

Life skills for enhancing social competence during adolescence

Social competence is often seen as a desirable trait during adolescence as it is considered as a protective factor in resilient individuals. It promotes personal and interpersonal effectiveness by enhancing skills needed for dealing with environmental challenges in daily life situations. Poor social competence has been associated with a number of psychosocial troubles during adolescence, including mental disorders, emotional and behavioral problems. Of the many skill building programs used to enhance adolescent social competence, Life Skills Education and Training have been significant ones. The present study investigates the utility of life skills training in enhancing social competency during adolescence. A pre- and post-test experimental design was used in the study to analyze the stated objectives. Adolescent Social Competency Scale was used to select the study sample. 160 adolescent students (mean age=16.44) who scored low on social competence participated in the study. These were randomly divided into the experimental and control group (n=80), consisting of equal number of male and female adolescents (n=40). Participants in the experimental group were trained on six of the ten core life skills, based on the module prepared by the researcher. The training lasted for 10 sessions following which post-test assessments were done. Data obtained was analyzed using descriptive statistics like mean, standard deviation and inferential statistics including independent sample t-test and repeated measures of ANOVA. The results of the study indicate a significant effect of life skills training in enhancing adolescent social competence, irrespective of gender.

Hita Claudia Rao

Effect of life skills training on emotional distress: a comparative study between adolescent boys and girls

Adolescence is considered as a crucial stage for emotional development. It is also seen as a time of hyper-emotionality, emotional conflict, and volatile mood states. Given that adolescents lack skills for emotional management, emotional distress during these years can hamper their immediate growth and adversely affect their transition to the next stage of life. Interventions that promote positive emotional development during adolescence are the need of the hour. Keeping this in focus, the present study investigated the Effect of Life Skills Training on Adolescent boys and girls with high Emotional Distress. The study used pre- and post-test experimental design with a control group to examine the stated objectives. 160 adolescent boys and girls (n=80), with a mean age of 16.44 years, were selected for the study using Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Of these, 80 in the experimental group (boys=40, girls=40) were trained in life skills. Descriptive statistics, independent sample ttest and repeated measures of ANOVA were used to analyze obtained results. Major findings of the study indicate that Life Skills training has significant effect in reducing emotional distress and improving emotional health in adolescents. And the significance of it was found to be higher in girls compared to boys.

Hita Claudia Rao

Challenges faced by teachers of learners with learning disability

This Research Paper elucidates the challenges faced by teachers while teaching learners with learning disability. This has been conducted as a research study by the Research Scholar which explores multifaceted aspects of ‘challenges based on the responses given by the participants in the interview. It is a study designed to identify multifaceted dimensions of challenges faced by teachers while teaching learning disabled children. The research study analyzes the impact of challenges on teachers and how they are overcoming these challenges. This descriptive study was carried out as qualitative research under an Indian scenario based on Primary data available on the subject. The research enquiry focused on several research questions: What is the teacher’s understanding of learning disability? What challenges do remedial teachers face while teaching children with learning disability and how do they overcome them? What are the teaching approaches and methodology used to teach children with learning disability? The study will try to highlight the challenges faced by teachers to address them in front of the school administration. The challenges faced by teachers while teaching learning disabled children, i.e., ‘Teaching material and Curriculum structure’, ‘Behavioural issues’, ‘Lack of time’, ‘Parental expectations and Parental issues’, ‘Motivation’, ‘Self-esteem’ and ‘Emotional issues. The methods used to overcome these challenges were pointed out and analyses. Each teacher was using their own methods to tackle these challenges but some methods were used generally and an individual tailored method were developed and used according to respective learners.

Hashir Ahammed A V

Parental perception about western cartoon on child’s mental health in pakistan

The purpose of this study is to explore the impacts of foreign cartoons programs on the social behavior and attitude of Pakistani Children. It is forecasting different cartoon programs 24/7; hence, children spend most of their leisure in front of the television. All these cartoon characters affect the social life and psyche of the children and induce positive and negative mannerism in their daily lifestyles. It has found that one of the most disturbing factor is that the ferocity in children today is increasing rapidly due to following their favorite violent cartoon characters which are even different from their culture and societal norms. The issue is violence is what they see in every cartoon program in one or the other way. Their Guardians are unaware that these cartoons they let their children watch are destroying their parenting as negative forces are attacking the innocent minds of this generation. The study gives the insight of why and what is happening with non-parametric statistics studied and used for thorough analysis. The behavioral outcome of the kids like, imitating their preferred animation character, utilizing various dialects, watching the TV as opposed to deciding on outdoor games and being difficult about getting precisely the same outfits and embellishments as their adored character. This contextual analysis features the disturbing circumstance that guardians are uninformed of. There is something other than mimicking the particular character. The only traits of watching these foreign cartoon characters is that it might damage their own customs and they wildly become to believe these characters as their role models.

Zaki Hasan

A study of beliefs of teacher educators about relationship between teaching and research

The purpose of this study is to explore the belief of teacher educators about the relationship between teaching and research. Keeping in view the role of the teacher educators, a survey was done. The beliefs of teacher educators were explored with the help of an opinionaire. The collected data were analyzed through qualitative method of analysis. It was found that the secondary teacher educators were positive about the need of research with a little dilemma between teaching and research.

Rupal Mankad

Sumitra Nain

Dept Of Pharmacy,banasthali Vidyapith

Dr Prerna Soni

Pandit Ravishankar Shukla University Raipur Chhattisgarh

Dhivya R

Psgr Krishnammal College For Women

Dr Vipul Sharma

Gurukul Knagri University, Haridwar

Dr Narendar Bhojak

Gcrc, P.g. Department Of Chemistry Government Dungar College (three Times Consecutively ’a’grade By Naac) Bikaner 334001

Reet Kumar Reet

Mahatma Gandhi Central University Motihari Bihar

Nsikakabasi George

Kano State Ministry Of Health

Annette Veit

Austria

Sudipta Saha

Sri Sri University

Akarue, Blessing Okiemute

College Of Education, Warri

Souren Bhattacharya

University Of Technology , Jaipur, Rajasthan